German Wines

German wines have been around for centuries upon centuries, dating back to 100 B.C. when the ancient Romans conquered the land and started planting grapes soon thereafter. In 1803, once Napoleon conquered the Rhine region, the land was then divided up and sold amongst the states and private owners.

There are thirteen main wine regions in Germany, which are broken down to 39 districts of which can be further divided into 167 collective vineyards. There are over 2,600 separate vineyards.

Hof is actually known for its Hops and premium beers but it sits just East of the Franken region.

Germany is known for their red and their white varietals, which are:

Red Varietals:
Spätburgunder        
Dornfelder              
Scharzriesling         
Dunkelfelder                  
Domina
Portugieser
Trollinger
Lemberger
Heroldrebe

White Varietals:
Riesling                     
Silvaner                   
Bacchus                  
Grauer Burgunder    
Faberrebe               
Gutedel                  
Ortega                   
Gewürztraminer
Müller-Thurgau
Kerner
Scheurebe
Weißer Bugunder
Huxelrebe
Morio-Muskat
Elbling
Chardonnay

Great wines to taste:

Blue Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir) – the Burgunder family ranks among the oldest cultural vines of mankind.

Messina Hof Private Reserve Pinot Noir – Winner at the Tasters Guild International Wine Competition.

Wilhelm Bergmann Mosel 2007 Piesporter Michelsberg Riesling – Kabinett – The Mosel and its tributaries are between Luxembourg and Koblenz.

Messina Hof Riesling – Voted the Top Texas Wine by the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, sold for $28,000!

Henkell Trocken Dry-Sec – Adam Henkell, a wine merchant, founded the Henkell & Co. winery in

 Wiesbaden, Germany in 1832.

Messina Hof Brut Sparkling Wine – Crisp, refreshing, and filled with bubbles.

Schmitt Sohne Beeren Auslese Reinhessen 2005 – A harvest of individually selected, overripe berries.

Glory Late Harvest Muscat Canelli – Grown in our Halfway, Texas vineyards about 40 mile northwest of Lubbock.

 

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